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LUISA MAZZONE

LUISA MAZZONE
LUISA MAZZONE
Photo by Antonio Barrella
LUISA MAZZONE
LUISA MAZZONE

In 2010 Francesco Schietroma lost his job. And it is impossible to understand how truly dramatic it can be for a cartoon artist who started as a painter from the Accademia delle Belle Arti in Rome, to end a 10-year chapter spent employed as a Unix systems analyst. At that point, Francesco needed to understand what to do: for an artist with a passion for films – in hindsight – the choice wasn’t that difficult: he found himself drawing great films that were never made, beginning with “Something's Got to Give” by George Cukor.

In 2012, just after completing her studies at experimental centre, Luisa Mazzone found herself on the threshold of the film market, having trained professionally to design for the cinema but only with a badly paid demand for filling in gaps in the set design of “La Grande Bellezza”. This was the second dramatic change: she gave it up and concentrated on drawing. And she drew Pasolini, a lot of Pasolini.

In 1966, Pier Paolo Pasolini began to write a short film entitled “Le avventure del Re magio randagio e il suo schiavetto Schiaffo”, thinking of Totò in the leading role. When Il Principe died, the script was put back in a box, but didn’t stay there long. Little by little it was transformed into “Porno-Teo-Kolossal”, a long film that was the sum of his entire poetry and film production.

 «I read all of it myself today [...] And I feel traumatised [...] I truly hope that you will like the film and that you will agree to do it: but also that you will help me and encourage me to face such a huge task. I embrace you, my friend, yours, Pier Paolo». These are the words sent to Eduardo De Filippo, the new appointed protagonist, engraved on the magnetophone of the director who, one month later, would die on the beach of Ostia.

You can imagine what happened, when Francesco and Luisa met in 2010: they began to work on a graphic novel about a great film that was never made: “Porno-Teo-Kolossal” by Pier Paolo Pasolini. Just one detail: Francesco and Luisa haven’t yet found the right publisher. Call them to offer. Meal times too.

The story has been written by Andrea Pergola, writer.

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