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Livia Lazzari

Livia Lazzari
Livia Lazzari
Photo by Antonio Barrella
Livia Lazzari
Livia Lazzari

Lapilli. At the beginning there were chunky Berber necklaces. Heavy rings around dark-skinned fingers. Earrings swinging from long, elastic lobes. The jewels were the mute words of their owners – words that said: here I am, this necklace is my story. And it was the sound of these words that, through archeology and anthropology and with an intense curiosity that comes first from the gut then from the head before being shaped into solid matter through the fingers, led Livia Lazzari towards jewellery. At first, Livia didn't wear her own jewels, and then she began to put the rings on her fingers and the necklaces around her neck, and discovered that even symbols need a translation, so she forged them in accordance with the need that they draw in people everywhere.

She wanted her jewellery to carry the message of the ancient subterranean depths which have belonged to man since the dawn of time, but interpreted for the present day. Lapilli and sulphur, ash and silver, the metals of the olden days when bronze, iron and copper become the new word of man. Her favourite material is metal: it doesn't stubbornly insist on one form but can change infinitely, and it is within this infinity that Livia finds her shapes: intricate arabesques curving around the neck, small volcanoes around the fingers, fine swirls which form a copper frond on the wrist. It is thanks to this cobbled lane of ancient shamanic stories and suggestions of the primitive that Livia established her brand Voodoo like a precious stone. In just four years and six collections she found her customers through hard work and dedication.

Voodoo is present in Lebanon, Kuwait, France, Germany and the Netherlands as well as in Italy. She would like to open her own workshop and studio in Rome, because it is in Italy that she wants to develop her brand. She would like to tell the Italians that the value of the object is not in the alluring glint of gold or the sparkle of stones, but in the hand that creates it.

The story has been written by Rossella Milone, writer

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