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Little London

Little London
Little London
The Roman Notting Hill
Little London
Little London

In the heart of the Flaminio district there is a small street characterized by the narrow and low buildings, british gates, decorated wooden doors: this street is also known as the 'little London'. Via Bernardo Celentano is a private street which can only be accessed on foot, outside the chaotic traffic of the capital. A straight path with low houses, close to each other, the wrought iron gates that separate the property from the sidewalk, manicured gardens, stone stairs and bricks leading to wooden doors in perfect British style.

Suddenly finding himself in this closed street, it would seem really to be in Notting Hill, the famous district of London; it would seem to be in England because the architecture and the urban furniture of this area of ​​Rome are undoubtedly iconic. Instead we are in the eternal city. The road is composed of two rows of small villas, with iron gates and wooden doors that, for colors and shapes, immediately lead visitors into a parallel version of Notting Hill, but with cobblestones on the ground.

The pleasant old-style houses extend for about 200 meters, representing an urban fragment out of time. In 1909 he was elected mayor of Rome Ernesto Nathan, Anglo-Italian, cosmopolitan, Mazzinian, anticlerical whose dream was to bring Rome to the level of the great European capitals. As soon as he was elected, he managed to approve a town plan, subtracted from the building speculation, so that the buildings should not be more than 24 meters tall and the cottages did not exceed 2 floors and have small iron gates. These directions were greeted with enthusiasm by Quadrio Pirani, architect father of little London. Initially intended for the housing of senior officials, when Rome became the capital of Italy, the villas remain today as evidence of the changes and changes that Rome underwent at the beginning of 1900.

The charming street, although always suggestive and apparently far from the chaos of the city, is affected by the passing of time: some facades are no longer intact and residents contend a diatribe about whether or not to consider the street relevance of the buildings, and then close it completely to the passage, also pedestrian.

- LE OPERE -