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Tor Marancia's murals

Tor Marancia's murals
Tor Marancia's murals
Street art redesigns public housing
Tor Marancia's murals
Tor Marancia's murals

A participatory public art project aiming at urban regeneration. Big City Life is a collection of murals developed with the aim of strengthening the social and cultural fabric of the neighborhood of Tor Marancia, symbol of the Roman suburbs too often forgotten. The area has been coloured due to street art and is an extraordinary open-air museum, a permanent public museum. An alternative tourist route compared to the traditional ones.

The project of such a high social and cultural value has made available to Italian and foreign artists, 2,500 square meters of the façade of the eleven Ater buildings in the area of ​​Via di Tor Marancia 63. The result is a unique collection of 22 murals of 145 sq.m. each.

The artists have worked 70 days for 12 hours a day in contact with local people. They have become spokesmen, consuming about 765 974 liters of paint and spray cans. Along Viale Tor Marancia at the Civic 63 we come across in the work by Argentinean rider Jaz, "The weight of history". The fight between an Italian and an Argentine metaphorically symbolizes the historical ties between the two countries.

A little further on there is Luca, from behind, trying to climb up a ladder designed by him to look over. "The child redeemer" is a sweet and gentle homage by French artist Seth. The story of Luca is one of the most exciting of the path, because Luca was born in that building and died while playing football.

Only some of the murals, though, are directly visible from the street. To be able to look at others it is necessary to access the area. Just entering the courtyard from the entrance of Viale Tor Marancia 63, "Our Lady from Shanghai" seems to fulfill the task of guiding the visitor through the Roman Shanghai. Mr. klevra portrays a Madonna with child in warm colors, red, ocher and yellow that recalls the Byzantine religious icons. At the bottom, like a prayer, the words "under thy protection."

Walking down the hall, you reach the opposite façade on which stands the work "Veni, vidi, vinci." An oversight desired compared to the motto of Caesar, because Vinci is also the name of Andrea, a disabled boy who lives on the second floor of that building with no elevator. A work of denunciation from Lek & Sowat reflecting the strong penetration occurred between artists and residents.

Crossing the internal driveway, on the right, suddenly it seems to tick a glimpse of the Sistine Chapel. This is the last building on the corner of Via Valeria Rufina and street of Santa Petronilla on which is depicted a detail of the hands of God and Adam. The Italian Jerico abandons the religious theme and explores the relationship between man and nature ("Distance man - nature"). A romantic branch of peach tree lights up the whole façade of this open-air museum.

- LE OPERE -