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GIULIA VENANZI

GIULIA VENANZI
GIULIA VENANZI
Photo by Antonio Barrella
GIULIA VENANZI
GIULIA VENANZI

Passion is a funnel full of vortices that often seem to distance you from your voice, but that is in fact leading you towards it: Giulia Venanzi knows that well, she, who has even completed a degree in Modern Languages before surrendering to her own gaze so enrolling in the three-year course in Visual Communication at the IED in Rome and spending a semester at the School of Visual Arts in New York, thanks to the International Exchange Program. Once she returned to Italy, she thought she would travel somewhere else, but instead she immediately began to work as an assistant for many photographers and she has also been the reporter for a politician during his election campaign, before focusing on where she wanted to be.

«I took portraits, I photographed physical people, and then I realised that it wasn’t what I wanted, that the psychological counterpart of the subject that was in front of me didn’t interest me. I preferred to be a director and creator, I preferred inanimate objects, whether in their stringent reality or in the possibility of a transfiguration», Giulia told me, while we were drinking a juice and talking about Pachino tomatoes.

And so, her camera lens concentrated on rooms, apartments and houses, portraits for companies that sell and rent properties (like One Fine Stay) or for architects and restaurant owners and on food with photos for restaurants, catering, farms, realities like the Consorzio Ciociaro, publications such as Il Gambero Rosso and social dinners, like VizEat.

Since 2012, however, food has also become something else for Giulia, who has created Conceptual Food, an ongoing photographic series that has already received awards in several international competitions and that is based on the transfiguration of food that becomes a new material. Photos that transform bread into lunar terrain and courgettes into a burnt shirt, a work of research and stories that is founded on the synthesis of its compound aesthetics into an idea of the world that, for her – and now also for me – has the shape of a Pachino tomato.

The story has been written by Elisa Casseri, writer.

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