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FRANCESCO BONESI

FRANCESCO BONESI
FRANCESCO BONESI
Photo by Antonio Barrella
FRANCESCO BONESI
FRANCESCO BONESI

The topic of my first lesson in Italian literature at university was the change from Latin to the vernacular language.

Straight out of high school, I expected a string of Christian classics, of translations into the vernacular, but I was submerged by a number of texts that suddenly made medieval an everyday occurrence.

It seems incredible, but even in the years when Dante or Petrarca handwrote pages with immortal verses, other men spoiled walls, signs and doors with writing that would pass down over the course of history, totally anonymous, bearing witness to the changes in language.

This is how I discovered the Verona riddle, and the even older writings on the walls of Pompeii and Herculaneum.Vandalism and obscene amorous confessions were interspersed with signs that announce places, customs and traditions.However, if the present were to be treated with the taxonomic passion of philology and classic archaeology, how would the modern world be portrayed?

I don’t know if this was the starting point for Francesco Bonesi, but it was most definitely the result.In a fully atypical mode Roma type is a kind of map of Rome without any urban references, a map made up exclusively of signs and their evocations.The signs are signs, friezes, engravings and the evocations are the relative references.

In fact, we could say that Bonesi’s Rome is a Rome that actually sticks to the present data. It is made up of typically Roman places.

However, by accumulation, these places transform everyday Rome into a dreamed Rome that sometimes seems ancient, sometimes modern, and other times future.

The story has been written by Nicola Ingenito, writer.

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