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Clinamen

Clinamen
Clinamen
renato ranaldi
Clinamen
Clinamen | renato ranaldi

On Friday, March 9th at 6 pm, within the CAMUSAC exhibition program, the Clinamen, an anthological exhibition by Renato Ranaldi curated by Bruno Corà, was opened to the public.

Clinamen, in Lucretius' reflections on epicurean thought, is a natural and spontaneous condition to a material and conceptual deviation that allows the advent of new phenomenologies.

In the formative modalities of the artistic work of Ranaldi it occurs as a practice of encounter and contrast between entities existing or produced by the artist himself through which to give life to new forms, as in the cycle of works by the artist named "Fuoriquadro" (2008) ), "Fuoriasse" (2008), "Fuoricarta" (2012) and "Scioperii" (2014-15).

In the vast rooms of the Cassino Museum there are a large number of works, of different dates, bearing the common denominator of an ideational and linguistic deviance towards presumed norms that both the artistic tradition and the actuality and the oscillation of tastes, that characterize it, they would require to observe.

There are therefore sculptures on display such as real plastic complexes such as, Bilico celeste, 1988, presented at the 1988 Venice Biennale, Tetrabalulo, 1989, Ikona, 1996, Bilico d'i 'ciucho e la berva, 2003, Nudo sdraiato, 2005, The joie de mourir, 2007 and a series of "Fuoriquadro" of several years and measures, as well as some new installations realized in situ in the museum's premises during the exhibition.

Bruno Corà defines Ranaldi as one of the most radical and disconcerting artists on the Italian and European artistic scene since the 1960s and still active, refractory to any critical identification that intends to combine his work with trends and movements that came to manifest in the last sixty years.

On the occasion of the exhibition a catalog will be produced, published by Gangemi Editore, including images of all the works on display, an unpublished text by Renato Ranaldi and a critical essay by Bruno Corà.

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